dreaming of love the imagination

Photo by Staffage via: kaboompics.com

Photo by Staffage via: kaboompics.com

We should all dream and we should, at some point, all dream about love. We’re not setting high expectations or even idealizing relationships. We’re just using our imaginations because sometimes, the imagination is all we have. We’re all just dreaming of love. This brings me back to what Victor E. Frankl says about finding meaning in life. When the odds are against us and we come face to face with immense suffering or unbearable grief, we dream. We dream of better days ahead and hold onto hope. Hope is the intangible force that keeps us hanging on and moving forward, with faith driving our feelings and actions. I think most people have a vision of what love looks and feels like, even if it is based on unrealistic fantasies. Fantasies, hopes, dreams, and visions of love are simple manifestations of subconscious erotic and neurotic desires. It shouldn’t be surprising then, that media turns our desires into a dramatic visual on screen. In effect, as a society, we’re taught to believe that love should feel a certain way and that certain actions are romantic while others are not only unromatic, but hindrances to love and budding relationships. I have my own dream and vision of an “ideal” love, but read it with this in mind: an ideal love is not necessarily a happy one, nor is it always the right one. It is the fictional one that we can escape to in times of need, when our lives become inundated with stress, responsibilities, expectations, fights, and synergistic effects of everyday troubles.
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on heroes, thick skin, and emotion are the walls necessary?

Benches

What happens to us when times get tough? People always say that the only constant in life is change. Things are always changing, although not necessarily in good ways. Sometimes it’s good, but every once in a while we encounter the bad, and who’s to say what is positive and what is negative? I think we have to agree – and it certainly shows in all of my writing – that we understand nothing. We try to make sense of the world as best we can, given our limited resources, knowledge, and wit. There will never be a day, at least in the near future, where we understand all that there is. Tough times call for thicker skin, right? It’s what everyone I’ve ever met tells me. But I always force myself to remember that tough skin makes us immune to all the rest of the stimuli in the world. Building yourself to be tough is not always good. Take it from someone who has spent almost half of his life doing just that. I wouldn’t say that it’s hopeless, but it most certainly isn’t necessary. Why do we feel the need to create this impermeable exterior while inside, we’re slowly crumbling under the pressures of being human?

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i dare you to watch this entire video i made it, you should too

This is a massive statement. I see it both as a lesson in the short-lived attention span of our generation, due to the distractions of technology and always being “connected”, but at the same time, it’s a lesson in patience. This relates to active-listening as well. By the time you’re a few minutes into the video, you’ll start to tune out, if you’re like most people. There’s a reason that adverts and YouTube videos tend to be short and that’s why Vine and Instagram videos are so popular.

a film about coffee drink of ages

A Film About CoffeeOn June 3rd, I found myself amongst a vast sea of assorted button-ups, coffee cups, and mustaches. I never thought that the smell of popcorn and the smell of coffee would work together, but for some reason, it left me with a supreme hunger for both of them at the same time.

I had the pleasure of settling down on the balcony of the historic Castro Theatre in San Francisco to watch A Film About Coffee. I had caught wind of the trailer about three or four months ago and immediately knew I wanted to watch this film, regardless of format. I signed up for their newsletter, which you should also do here, and right when they announced a screening in San Francisco about a month ago, I jumped online and bought a pair of tickets. The first trailer I watched had reeled me in with it’s intense imagery of a beverage I love so much. On a slow day, I drink about two cups, so it really has become a ritual – that’s why I looked forward to it and had relatively high expectations for it. As a plus, the film features a lot of my beloved San Francisco roasters. I’m glad I made it to the showing, because it not only met my expectations, but exceeded them across the board, leaving me with a greater appreciation and understanding of coffee.

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